• Uncategorized

    SCHOONER/BRIGANTINE ‘AGENORIA’ OF ST. DOGMAELS

    by  • June 10, 2014 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

      The ‘Agenoria‘ was a St. Dogmaels owned Schooner of 117 tons, built in 1834 at Newport by John Harvard. In 1834-46 Captain William Evans of Ty’r Major, Newport, Pembrokeshire, was the master of the vessel. In April 1834 the ‘Agenoria‘ was in Newport, Monmouthshire. In June 1836 she was in Cardiff. In April 1837...

    Read more →

    SLOOP ‘AERON’ OF CARDIGAN

    by  • June 10, 2014 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

      The ‘Aeron’ was a Cardigan Sloop of 65 tons, built in 1814 at Llanddewi Aberarth. In 1824-26 Captain Thomas Thomas was the master. In March 1824 he sailed from Pembrey to Waterford, and in May that year he sailed the ‘Aeron‘ from Swansea to Beaumaris.In 1835-37 Captain William Davies was the master of...

    Read more →

    SLOOP ‘ADEONA’ OF ST. DOGMAELS

    by  • June 8, 2014 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

      The ‘Adeona‘ was a St. Dogmaels owned Sloop of 76 tons, built in 1802 at Cardigan. In 1804 Captain Lloyd may have been the vessel’s master. In early February 1804 he sailed from Cardigan to Dublin. In late March 1804 he sailed from Llanelli to Cardigan with a cargo of iron. In late...

    Read more →

    THE SNOW (SHIP) ‘ACTIVE’ OF CARDIGAN

    by  • June 8, 2014 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

      The ‘Active‘ of Cardigan was a Snow of 142 tons. She was acquired by the Davies family in 1809 in Cardigan. Captain John Davies of Bridge House, Bridge Street, Cardigan, was her master. The sailing history of the vessel is confused by other ships of the same name with other Captain Davies’ at...

    Read more →

    BRIG ‘ACORN’ OF CARDIGAN

    by  • June 8, 2014 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

    The ‘Acorn‘ was a Cardigan Brig of 92 tons. Built 1812 in Cardigan. Her first master, by 1813, was Captain Roberts. In October 1815 Captain Roberts arrived at Swansea from Cork in ballast. In July 1818 the ‘Acorn‘ sailed from Newport, Monmouthshire, to London with a cargo of iron. On 22 September 1819 the ship...

    Read more →

    SCHOONER ‘ABIGAIL’. ST. DOGMAELS

    by  • June 8, 2014 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

    The ‘Abigail‘ was a St. Dogmaels owned Schooner of 70 tons. Built 1836 at Cardigan by David Rees. In 1836-55 her master was Captain William Griffiths of Abigail House, High Street, St. Dogmaels. In October 1838 the ‘Abigail‘ sailed from Cardiff to Galway with iron and ballast, putting in at Milford on 2 November. In March...

    Read more →

    King Arthur and Cardigan Castle

    by  • December 1, 2013 • Uncategorized • 6 Comments

    CARDIGAN CASTLE AND KING ARTHUR.   Was Cardigan Castle the site of King Arthur’s Camelot?   This is not the sort of question which I would usually pose, but I thought I’d stoke up the fires of debate with something that the Cardigan Castle campaign and publicity has so far almost completely neglected to...

    Read more →

    Nonconformist Chapels around the Teifi Estuary

    by  • November 30, 2013 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

    Local Nonconformist Chapels   The Nonconformist chapels that have been so symbolic of the Welsh landscape for the last three centuries are now vanishing at an alarming rate. Here is a list of some of the local chapels. I have used the following abbreviations: B – Welsh or English Baptist; CM – Calvinistic Methodist...

    Read more →

    MILLS AROUND THE TEIFI ESTUARY

    by  • November 30, 2013 • Uncategorized • 3 Comments

          History Man – A List of Local Mills.   It’s strange how once-familiar landmarks can disappear from a landscape. Until a century ago, mills were more common than parish churches – there were thousands of them all over the country. Now they are something of an endangered species, with St. Dogmaels’...

    Read more →

    No. 34 PENDRE

    by  • September 5, 2013 • Cardigan, Ceredigion, Modern, Period, Post-Medieval, Shop, Site Type, Uncategorized • 0 Comments

    History: In 1851-91 William Jenkins, mason, lived here. In 1851-1935 William Jenkins the younger lived here. In 1851 the occupiers were: William Jenkins, 43, grocer; Elinor Jenkins, 43, his wife; John Jenkins, 18, their son, cabinet-maker; David Jenkins, son, 16, mariner; Hannah Jenkins, daughter, 15; Margaret Jenkins, daughter, 13; Thomas Jenkins, son, 10; Elinor...

    Read more →