• CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS

    by  • July 28, 2013 • Ceredigion, Church, Llechryd, Medieval, Modern, Period, Post-Medieval, Site Type • 0 Comments

    History:

    In 1499 David Morris became the Rector. Philip Vaughan succeeded him on 16th January 1522. On 10th September 1525 Philip Vaughan was removed from his post. In 1546 the priest received 100s. annually from the churches of Llechryd and Mwnt, which between them had 200 communicants. The annual income from the two was £6 – the King’s Tenths amounting to 10s. In 1548 Arthur or John Dudley, an aged priest, was the incumbent of Llechryd and Mwnt.

    On 16th December 1551 George Guldin leased the chapels and tithes of Llechryd and Mwnt for 21 years at 100s per annum, as had Thomas Sidbithame at an earlier date. On 27th November 1567 Robert Byrte leased the “…Free Chapel of Mounte and Llecheryd…” for 100s. Oddly, the church is shown as “Capel Langbrid” on Caxton’s 1578 map and on John Speed’s map of 1610. On 25th September 1609 King James I granted “…all those our free chapels of Mount and Llecered…” to Francis Morris and Francis Phelips of London. 1638 has been claimed by some as the date of foundation – perhaps the church was rebuilt at that time?

    A beam at the church was inscribed “W. L. 1766”. In 1770 Rev. John Thomas became the Vicar. In 1795 Rev. Morgan Jones became the Vicar. In 1797 Rev. William Jones became the Vicar. In 1808-33 Rev. Sampson Owen was the Vicar. In 1812 John Pugh, infant son of John Pugh, Officer of Excise at Cardigan, was buried here. On 4th October 1812 Rev. Sampson Owen became the Rector of Bridell in addition to Llechryd and Tremain. On 24th March 1833 Rev. Sampson Owen died aged 62.

    Church of the Holy Cross in March 2000 (c) Glen K Johnson

    Church of the Holy Cross in March 2000 (c) Glen K Johnson

    In 1833 Rev. James Owen, the son of the previous incumbent, became the Vicar. In 1833-79 Rev. James Owen was the Vicar. In 1838 the Church was restored and enlarged. On 14th March 1865 James S. Owen, son of the Vicar, died aged 65. On 7th August 1870 Mary Owen, wife of the Rev. James Owen, died aged 60. In December 1876 Mr. Lascelles of Pencraig, donated land for the building of a new church. A notice of intention to build a new church was published on March 13th 1877. The church here was abandoned in 1879. The building re-opened on 18th June 1933, after 56 years of disuse. An open-air service was held here on 2nd July 1950. The church became a listed building in 1964. On 10th August 1994 the former Grade II Listed Building was removed from the Historic Buildings Register. The roof had recently given way. On 15th February 1996 consolidation work began to turn the property into a ‘controlled ruin’, removing the roof and all internal features. Consolidation was completed on 4th June 1997.

    Description:

    In 2000 the following observations were made:

    C19 and earlier church ruins, roofless and lacking fenestration. Slate rubble with red brick dressings to openings, on a cruciform plan. W bellcote with entry arch beneath.

    Sources:

    NLW Church in Wales: Episcopal Registers of St. David’s

    The History & Antiquities of the County of Cardiganshire, Samuel Rush Meyrick 1808

    Slater’s Directory of South Wales 1852

    The History of Cilgerran, John Roland Phillips 1867

    Kelly’s Directory of South Wales 1875

    Notice – Parish Church of Llechryd 13/03/1877

    Cardigan Priory in the Olden Days, Emily M Pritchard 1904

    Historical Society of West Wales Transactions Vol. I 1911

    Cardigan & Tivy-Side Advertiser 1933; 1950; 1996-97

    Early Chancery Proceedings Concerning Wales, E A Lewis 1937

    Records of the Court of Augmentations Relating to Wales & Monmouthshire, E A Lewis & J Conway Davies 1954

    Welsh Saints & Shrines Vol. 2: Our Lady of Cardigan, Rev. Silas M Harris 1964

    The Teifi: Scenery & Antiquities of a Welsh River, Richard J Colyer 1987

    Buildings of Historical or Architectural Interest – Llangoedmor, Julian Orbach, CADW 1994

    Castell Malgwyn, Andrew Lester 2000.

    (c) Glen K Johnson 28/07/2013

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